Fun and Creative Easter Activities to Try Out!

March 27, 2018 Published by

Talking about the Easter celebration provides a great opportunity to explore different religions and traditions with your child, helping to raise their awareness of and empathy towards others.  It also lets them know that Easter isn’t just about chocolate eggs!   

Hopefully, the spring sunshine will make an appearance so you can get outside and explore all that the season has to offer (although, splashing in muddy puddles is great fun too…).

A good starting point would be to tell your child the story of the Easter. You could act it out with them or encourage them to create a comic strip, both great ways to encourage storytelling and writing skills.

Easter Scavenger Hunt

Grab a bag or basket, and get the children outside and into nature. Start by printing off the scavenger hunt list from the Woodland Trust, then send them out into the garden to find smooth pebbles, soft feathers and silky petals. Who will be the first to collect all of the Spring treasures?

Easter Basket

Making an Easter basket for your egg hunt is a simple creative activity. Older children can cut out their own decorations – encourage them to think about the Easter story when coming up with their design. You can provide stickers for younger children.

Origami Bunny

This is a great activity for encouraging children to listen, concentrate and follow instructions – it is also good for fostering a  sense of achievement as children can create something to be proud of. These would make great Easter cards or tags for Easter eggs!

Paper Daffodils

 Spring flowers make the perfect Easter decoration and these simple daffodils will last forever!  For younger children you can pre-cut the parts; older children can practice their scissor skills and cut them out for themselves.  These make a lovely table decoration if placed in little jam jars; or for your Easter Sunday roast, get your children to write names on the sticks and use them as place cards.

Easter Egg Bowling 

Some friendly competition for the whole family. Get each player to decorate their own hard-boiled egg, leaving one plain. Each player then takes turns rolling their decorated eggs toward the white one, trying to see who can get closest without touching it. (Be careful no one swaps out the eggs – it is April Fools day too after all!).

Easter Fingerprints

 You can turn a fingerprint into pretty much anything with a little imagination.  Once your child has put their prints on the page, encourage them draw on features like eyes and ears, to create their Easter themed character.  You can turn them into Easter cards, or place cards for the table.

Easter Egg Hunt with a twist

 This is a brilliant, chocolate-free alternative to classic Easter egg hunts! Get your children moving and laughing as they complete a range of challenges, hidden inside plastic eggs around the garden (you can save the eggs to use again next year). They will enjoy it even more if the grown-ups get involved! You can add rewards too in some ‘rarer’ eggs, like small toys, money, or a coupon (e.g. for a film night).

 

Painted Egg Boxes 

It turns out, egg cartons make the perfect Easter gift box! Your children can let their imaginations run wild creating tiny worlds – fill the box with shredded tissue and add small toys, chocolate eggs, or even a papier-mâché egg filled with confetti. They can gift it to friends and family, or it makes a great alternative for you to give your child for Easter.

Wine Cork Chicks 

Children will love creating these cute Easter chicks. This activity will develop fine motor skills in young children and older children can get creative and think of other Easter themed prints they could make using a cork. These can be printed on an Easter card, or use fabric paint to create Easter t-shirts or canvas bags.

Emoji Eggs 

Older children will simply love recreating their favourite emojis! Pre-schoolers will  develop their fine motor control as they use the paintbrush and pens, and the eggs can also be used to discuss emotions (e.g. asking them to pick out with emoji represents a certain emotion, or how they feel today).

Rabbit Finger Puppets

These simple finger puppets are a brilliant activity for older children – sewing is a challenging activity that fosters concentration, attention and perseverance and also hones fine motor control. Children can create their own puppet show, or hide little chocolate eggs inside the rabbits (they make great gifts, or table decorations).

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This post was written by Oomar Mauthoor

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