Why Should You Set Up a Fun Play Area for Your Child?

May 20, 2015

Babies and children learn the most of what they know from watching adults and those around them. Most children have a primary carer – the person to whom the child is most strongly attached, and who they watch and learn from at an amazing rate. It is well known that the closer a child is to a person, the easier it will be for them to begin to learn from him/her.

Young children, for example, are able to pick up on a lot of things from their primary carer as they spend a lot of time together at an early age.

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Girls Dressing up as Princesses

 

Should the primary carer provide their child with safe props such as a broom, play kitchen or toy phone, they are actively encouraging them to copy the behaviour of adults. This allows them to pretend to cook food or take a phone call, plus many of the other activities they see their primary carer do on a daily basis.

Setting up play areas and encouraging role play can teach your child many core skills, which they will benefit from both now and in the future.

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Cooking Creations Play Kitchen (Active Role Play Prop)

Good role play areas should have a range of props, the less specific the better, which encourage imaginative play. There is an argument for having multiple role play areas in a setting to accommodate different types of role play. This could include:

  • Active role play props –  This will enable your child to engage in active, boisterous, expansive role play (this could be outside if inside space is an issue).
  • A home corner –  Allocating a corner space in the house will promote modelling and acting out of familiar scenarios (ideally with a garage and workbench to encourage all sorts of play).
  • A fantasy, magical area –  This enables children to develop their imaginations without pre-conceived scripts.

If you cannot set up multiple play areas in your house at the same time, then consider changing the role play area regularly around the house. This is a great way to explore and encourage different types of play behaviour.

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This post was written by Anna Taylor

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